How to Want Very Little : zen habits

There’s a part of today’s consumerist world that drives us to want more, buy more, act on our impulses, hoard, spend to solve our problems, create comfort through shopping, seek thrills through travel, do more, be more.

What would happen if we broke from our addiction to wanting and buying more?

What would life be like if we didn’t need all that?

via How to Want Very Little : zen habits.

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A Healthy Way to Aspire to a Better Life : zen habits

Here’s the method in summary:

Notice your dissatisfaction.
Notice your ideals that you’re holding tightly to.
Loosen your hold on these ideals, and turn to the present moment.
Really see the present moment with curiosity, find something to appreciate.
Accept the present moment completely, with love.
From this place of peace, respond, take action. It might be toward an aspiration, or not, but it’s a response from a good place.
This method takes a lot of practice, and I’m still not very good at it. I enjoy the practice, though.

via A Healthy Way to Aspire to a Better Life : zen habits.

I’m Returning to Single-Tasking : zen habits

So here are the rules I’m going to try to follow:

One browser tab open. I want to focus on reading one thing, responding to one email at a time, doing one task in my browser at a time. I realize that I might have to open multiple tabs to work on something, and that’s fine, but if I have tabs open that don’t have anything to do with my current task, I’ll bookmark them for later, add to Instapaper, or add the task to my to-do list.
Know what I’m focusing on. When I open a tab, I have to consciously pause and think about what I’m trying to accomplish. That might be looking up some info, or writing something, or answering an email … whatever it is, I have to try to pause and make sure I’m being conscious about it.

via I’m Returning to Single-Tasking : zen habits.

A Simple, Powerful Self-Compassion Method : zen habits

Try this now if you’re feeling stressed, frustrated, in pain, disappointed, angry, anxious, worried, or depressed:

1.  Notice. Take a moment to turn inward and notice your pain in this moment. Now notice where it is in your body, and how it feels. Describe the pain to yourself in physical terms, in terms of quality, in terms of color or shape or motion.

2….

via A Simple, Powerful Self-Compassion Method : zen habits.

The Futility of Always Pushing Myself to Be More : zen habits

I can watch & let go. I’ve been learning recently that I can see these urges to be something more, to achieve something cool … just watch them arise. I can’t control the urges, but I can be mindful of them. And I can also realize that they won’t create meaning for me, that they’re just a fantasy, and let them go. It’s not always easy to let them go, but what has worked is realizing that pursuing these meaningless improvements has never resulted in what I’d hoped they would, and that I spent months and years of my time pursuing these things instead of creating true meaning.

via The Futility of Always Pushing Myself to Be More : zen habits.